#ChiMayDay 2014 Recap

On Thursday, May 1, hundreds of protestors participated in a march and protest on the anniversary of the Haymarket Riot. The march began on Desplaines at Haymarket Square and ended at 101 W. Congress Pkwy at the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) building. The issues of the day were immigration reform and workers rights. Marchers could be heard chanting “Si se puede” which means “Yes we can.” 

Below is a Storify that includes media I captured from reporting live on the scene. 

Start-up Interview Questions

Elissa Beckman, Director of People, www.bellycard.com

  1. I did some research and see that your education is in business and law. How did you end up working for a start up versus a more traditional position?
  2. What is it like working for a start-up versus a more established company?
  3. "Director of People" is not a traditional job title. Can you tell me a little bit more about what you do?
  4. What is the most challenging part of working for a start-up company?
  5. How does mobile technology affect Belly’s business model/contribute to success?
  6. What makes Belly successful?
  7. Do you see yourself ever going back to work for a more established company?
  8. What would you say to someone reluctant to work for a start-up?
comealongjonsnow:

And so, the Blue Line train crash memes begin.

Clever.

comealongjonsnow:

And so, the Blue Line train crash memes begin.

Clever.

Passenger from derailed train shares experience

There was a loud boom, as the train went completely dark and her body flew across the car.

"Oh, Jesus, I got tossed so bad," said Overton, a 26-year-old employee for the Transportation Security Administration. "I got tossed from one end of the train to the other end of the train."

She landed awkwardly on her arm, with a pain so sharp she said she couldn’t move at first. When she heard other passengers screaming “Oh my God!” over and over again, she forced herself to get up and flee the car in the fear it would catch fire.

(source: Chicago Tribune)

NTSB News Conference on Blue Line Train Derailment

On Thursday the CTA announced that the Blue Line O’Hare stop is expected to reopen this weekend. A train derailment that happened on Monday left the stop inoperable for the duration of this week. 

Since the news first broke, updates and stories on the issue have been pouring in. Photos of the damage began popping up immediately on social media. Apart from wanting to know if anyone was injured, the first question that came to my mind was, “What caused this to happen?”

At noon on the day of the accident, the National Transportation Safety Board held a conference to address questions.  The video below is courtesy of NBC Chicago.

Signal specialist Tim DePapae mentioned a number of things to consider that could have potentially contributed to the accident:

  • Was the signal system operating properly?
  • Were the operator’s actions appropriate?
  • Were there mechanical issues with the brakes, etc?

At the time of the conference there were no definitive answers as to what caused the crash.

Blue Line Train Derailment

Early Monday morning, news broke that a Blue Line train had derailed and as a result, trains would not be operating at the O’Hare stop.

First Twitter mention of the incident came directly from the CTA.

Soon after, media coverage of the accident began, providing details and photos from the scene.

Chicago’s Birthday Scrollkit

Making a website is no easy feat. After all, HTML is literally another language. For people like myself who are barely proficient in hypertext markup language, there is Scrollkit.

Last week my classmates and I attended Chicago’s 177th Birthday celebration at Daley Plaza. We used the Scrollkit to create a multimedia “birthday card” of sorts. You can check that out here.

We found that although there is a bit of a learning curve, Scrollkit is user friendly and yields a good looking final product that looks like a freestanding website. 

My only criticism is about the lack of an autosave function. 

ajtechknow:

Bringing an extinct species back to life sounds like the plot of “Jurassic Park,” but the real-life science is more complex and controversial. Learn how researchers could use genome editing to bring a creature like the woolly mammoth back from extinction on Sunday’s TechKnow, 7:30ET/4:30PT.

newsweek:

(via Lack of sleep blights pupils’ education)


Interesting and informative read. It’s interesting to see how technology negatively affects sleeping habits. It’s also kind of frightening to see how early those bad habits are formed.

Sleep deprivation is a significant hidden factor in lowering the achievement of school pupils, according to researchers carrying out international education tests.

It is a particular problem in more affluent countries, with sleep experts linking it to the use of mobile phones and computers in bedrooms late at night.

Sleep deprivation is such a serious disruption that lessons have to be pitched at a lower level to accommodate sleep-starved learners, the study found.

The international comparison, carried out by Boston College, found the United States to have the highest number of sleep-deprived students, with 73% of 9 and 10-year-olds and 80% of 13 and 14-year-olds identified by their teachers as being adversely affected.

In literacy tests there were 76% of 9 and 10-year-olds lacking sleep.

This was much higher than the international average of 47% of primary pupils needing more sleep and 57% among the secondary age group.

newsweek:

(via Lack of sleep blights pupils’ education)

Interesting and informative read. It’s interesting to see how technology negatively affects sleeping habits. It’s also kind of frightening to see how early those bad habits are formed.

Sleep deprivation is a significant hidden factor in lowering the achievement of school pupils, according to researchers carrying out international education tests. It is a particular problem in more affluent countries, with sleep experts linking it to the use of mobile phones and computers in bedrooms late at night. Sleep deprivation is such a serious disruption that lessons have to be pitched at a lower level to accommodate sleep-starved learners, the study found. The international comparison, carried out by Boston College, found the United States to have the highest number of sleep-deprived students, with 73% of 9 and 10-year-olds and 80% of 13 and 14-year-olds identified by their teachers as being adversely affected. In literacy tests there were 76% of 9 and 10-year-olds lacking sleep. This was much higher than the international average of 47% of primary pupils needing more sleep and 57% among the secondary age group.